Latin

Cha Cha 

Cha Cha adds fun to your dancing through its syncopated steps and many open movements. When you can dance many interesting combinations with ease, you and your partner will be able to feel the pulsating Latin rhythms which make this dance so fascinating.​

History of the Cha Cha
One of the most popular Latin dances in the U.S., the Cha Cha began as a variation of the Mambo called triple Mambo. It was so easy and so much fun; it became the rage of the early 1950’s. Its infectious one-two, on-two-three rhythm demands that sitters become dancers. Everybody can learn the Cha Cha.

Rumba

Learning to Dance the Rumba
The Cuban Motion is essential in most all Latin dances. The Rumba is used by good dancers everywhere and provides interesting variety suited to a limited space. Neat, attractive, precise footwork gives you confidence in your dancing.
Because of the slow, sultry beat it’s easy to learn a variety of body movements, spins and turns at a comfortable pace. Getting married? The Rumba is also a popular wedding dance too.
History of the Rumba
The Rumba was at the beginning of the Cuban and Latin American dance crazes. Danced to music inspired by African rhythms and Spanish melodies, the Americanized Rumba was the basis for the Mambo and the Cha Cha.

Samba

A street festival dance that originated in Brazil, the Samba was introduced to the United States in the late 1920s in a Broadway play called “Street Carnival.”.  Principal characteristics of the Samba are the rapid steps taken on a quarter of a beat and the pronounced rocking motion and sway of the dancing couple.

Jive

Jive is a very happy, boppy, energetic dance, with plenty of knee-lifting, bending, and rocking of the hips. The fastest of the Latin dances, Jive incorporates lots of kicks and flicks, even twirling of the woman, and doesn't move around the dance floor like other dances.

Paso Doble

Paso Doble is a lively style of dance to the duple meter march-like pasodoble music. It is modelled after the sound, drama, and movement of the Spanish and Portuguese bullfight. The traditional version as couple's dance originated in France and was then adopted in Spain and Portugal.