Ballroom

Slow Waltz

​​​​​​​The romantic Waltz is one of the most popular ballroom dances of all time.
Its elegance and grace is a timeless classic.. Perfect for your first dance as husband and wife or for that elegant black-tie affair you can’t go wrong learning this flowing movement. When you really learn how to Waltz you’ll feel as though you’re floating.
The Waltz is not only beautiful; it teaches amazing balance, control, posture, and grace. The basic Waltz steps are the foundation patterns used in most ballroom dances.
History of the Waltz  
Considered the mother of present day dances, the Waltz began in southern Germany in the seventeenth century. The popularity of the Waltz grew with the music of Johann Strauss and eventually blossomed in the 20th century.



Foxtrot

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The Foxtrot can be danced to a variety of tempos from slow and bluesy to the faster paced sounds of Frank Sinatra and the Brian Setzer Orchestra. A staple at weddings, big band events, and gala balls, the Foxtrot teaches smooth movement, rhythmical timing, and maneuverability.
Learning to combine steps easily and smoothly teaches variety and maneuverability. The Fox Trot posture is attractive in appearance and helpful to all other dances. Being able to dance to slow, medium and fast tempos will add confidence to your dancing and will assure fun and relaxation for your partner.
 History of the Foxtrot
In 1913, Harry Fox, a vaudeville comedian, introduced a trot to a ragtime song in the 1913 Ziegfeld Follies that pushed other trots into the background. It became America’s most popular dance and remains the standard of social dances.

Tango

​​​​​​​Tango is one of the most beautiful of all the dances. It is characterized by earthy and dramatic movements.
One of the most fascinating of all dances, tango is a sensual ballroom dance that originated in South America in the early twentieth century.
The hold in Tango is more compact than in other moving dances. The walk in Tango differs from walks in other dances in that it is a staccato action obtained by delaying the follow through of the free leg and foot.



Quickstep

Elegant, smooth and glamorous, Quickstep dancers are energetic while appearing extremely light on their feet. It should appear that the feet of the dancers barely touch the ground. Much like the Foxtrot, dancers should strive for elegance, being a very form-intensive dance. Upper body posture must be straight and strong throughout each movement.
While it evolved from the Foxtrot, the Quickstep now is quite separate. Unlike the modern Foxtrot, the man often closes his feet and syncopated steps are regular occurrences (as was the case in early Foxtrot). Three characteristic dance figures of the quickstep are the chassés, where the feet are brought together, the quarter turns, and the lock step.
This dance gradually evolved into a very dynamic one with a lot of movement on the dance floor, with many advanced patterns including hops, runs, quick steps with a lot of momentum, and rotation.

Wienesse waltz

The Viennese Waltz is a rotary dance where the dancers are constantly turning either toward the leader's right (natural) or toward the leader's left (reverse), interspersed with non-rotating change steps to switch between the direction of rotation. A true Viennese waltz consists only of turns and change steps. Other moves such as the fleckerls, American-style figures and side sway or underarm turns are modern inventions and are not normally danced at the annual balls in Vienna. Furthermore, in a properly danced Viennese Waltz, couples do not pass, but turn continuously left and right while travelling counterclockwise around the floor following each other.
As the Waltz evolved, some of the versions that were done at about the original fast tempo came to be called specifically "Viennese Waltz" to distinguish them from the slower waltzes. In the modern ballroom dance, two versions of Viennese Waltz are recognized: International Style and American Style.